End of the line…

Lansdowne Carhouse resided on Lansdowne between Paton and Wallace, servicing both streetcars and trolley buses to midwest Toronto. Eventually, the streetcars left the area with the trolley buses soon after, leaving Lansdowne vacant, much like Wychwood. During the process of being declared a historic site, Lansdowne garage was demolished due to chemical leaching, and the cost of maintaining it as a historic building,* Now it is a vacant lot with artistic fencing around it commemorating the carhouse’s valiant past, and this lone piece of track on the sidewalk near the north end of the lot is all there is to remind us of the golden era of streetcars through Lansdowne and Bloor.

*what a shame. It kills me

End of the line…

Lansdowne Carhouse resided on Lansdowne between Paton and Wallace, servicing both streetcars and trolley buses to midwest Toronto. Eventually, the streetcars left the area with the trolley buses soon after, leaving Lansdowne vacant, much like Wychwood. During the process of being declared a historic site, Lansdowne garage was demolished due to chemical leaching, and the cost of maintaining it as a historic building,* Now it is a vacant lot with artistic fencing around it commemorating the carhouse’s valiant past, and this lone piece of track on the sidewalk near the north end of the lot is all there is to remind us of the golden era of streetcars through Lansdowne and Bloor.

*what a shame. It kills me

Before work started I did a wandering tour of some of Toronto’s transit ghosts. This is (or was, I guess) Bicknell Loop. Lying at Bicknell and Rogers, this loop was the end of the suburban Rogers Rd streetcar, where it met the 48 Humber Blvd bus to carry passengers deeper into the suburbs of the (then much smaller) city of Toronto. 

Eventually the Rogers Rd streetcar vanished, replaced by the 63F and 63G branches of the Ossington trolley bus, still meeting the suburban Humber Blvd bus, keeping Bicknell as one of Toronto’s suburban-urban interchanges. 

Eventually, with the wearing trolley bus fleet and the need to restring wires, the Ossington trolley bus on Rogers was replaced with today’s 161 Rogers Rd bus. At this point Bicknell was a fading memory of what once was, but it was still used by the 161A short turn branch and the 168 Symington buses, keeping it in the TTC’s name.

Once Rogers and Weston Rds had the traffic signals revamped to allow Rogers Rd buses into Avon Loop (which had been surplused but now reinstated as a result of this rearrangement), Rogers short turn and Symington buses were extended to Weston, officially ending Bicknell’s service life

Compiling my part of the insurance claim (read: Examining my guitars and finding what was damaged).

I’m really hoping that someone at the insurance company understand “first guitar” syndrome and how she’s my baby and replacing her’s just not worth it but it’s $300 in repairs for a $200 guitar tops…

It’s been a week of lasts for the TTC: The last H6 train did it’s run yesterday, and today yesterday (Grr TTC, your unexpected preparedness and one day early launch cost me my photoshoot!) was the last run of a little 80 year old route known as 28 Davisville. 

The service began back in 1934, and since then the TTC has had one form or another of the 28 Davisville bus. Until today yesterday, when it became the 28 Bayview South, still maintaining the same service, but losing a part of TTC history

It is with great sorrow that today Toronto bid farewell to the last of the Hawker Siddley H-Series trains with the last H6 train operating on the Bloor-Danforth Line for the last time. 

These trains had been operating since the early 1980s, preceded by H1-H4 series trains, and coming soon after the H5 trains. (Transittoronto.org explains it much better than I ever could). 

Unfortunately, I couldn’t join in on the ride for the last farewell, but I dug up some pics from my early photography days of these trains around the line. You’ll be missed!